Lesson Plans 11/12 – 11/16

Weekly Summary: Students this week are wrapping up Unit 6.1.  The last of our presentations arguing for a given solution will be given.  Students will also have the opportunity to retake any 6.1 tests they wish as well as complete the pretest for 6.2.  Once 6.2 begins, students will get the opportunity to explore our new unit challenge, the mysterious RAD disease!

Benchmarks Addressed

  • MS-LS1-1 Conduct an investigation to provide evidence that living things are made of cells; either one cell or many different numbers and types of cells. 
  • MS-LS1-2 Develop and use a model to describe the function of a cell as a whole and ways the parts of cells contribute to the function.

  • MS-LS1-3 Use argument supported by evidence for how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells

 

Monday

Student Objective:  Students will communicate their solution to a problem providing evidence supporting their position.

Lesson Question:  How can man affect the flow of water in their community?

Students will start the hour practicing their presentation.  Students that have finished their presentation may finish their sub work from Wednesday.  Student groups will present solutions for the remainder of the hour.  Remaining time will be spent reviewing “best” solutions and why they were the most desirable.

 

Tuesday – Sub Day

Essential Question:  Why were salmon introduced into the great lakes in the 1950’s?

Lesson Objective:  Students will describe the life-cycle of a salmon.

I’ll be out today in order to pick up salmon eggs for our salmon in the classroom project.  Students will watch a video on the life-cycle of salmon while I am out.

Homework:  Salmon Worksheet

 

Wednesday

Essential Question:  What area do I need to improve in order to achieve my MAP goal?

Lesson Objective:  Individual per student

Compass Odyssey day.  Students will work on their compass odyssey as prescribed by their NWEA-MAP score.  We will also review the highpoints of our Salmon in the Classroom project.

 

Thursday – Lab Day

Essential Question:  How does a mystery pathogen make people sick and how can we come up with a treatment plan?

Student Objective:

  1. Students will communicate their prior knowledge and experience of systems and systems modeling.
  2. Students will communicate their prior knowledge and experience of body systems and systemic symptoms
  3. Students will use a model to communicate their prior knowledge and experience of how diseases and infections spread within a community.

 

Students will begin the hour by watching an anchor video about a disease in New York.  After discussing how the disease was addressed, students will participate in a disease spreading modelling activity.

 

Homework:  Completed Lab Sheet

 

Friday

Essential Question:  How do we conduct an investigation and use the information we gathered?

Student Objectives:

  1. Students will conduct an investigation and identify what makes a good investigation.
  2. Students will identify the purpose of the investigation and the importance of intellectual honesty.
  3. Students will describe collected data and identify any areas of ambiguity.
  4. Students will identify how ambiguity relates to the purpose of the investigation.

 

Students will begin the hour by learning about the unit challenge, a mysterious dancing disease.  Students will then watch an anchor video describing how a scientist would go about playing a game of “Clue”.  Students will then participate in their own version of Clue.  Students will finish the hour by investigating a disease outbreak at their school

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Lesson Plans 10/29 – 11/2

Weekly Summary:  Students are wrapping up their water unit with the final project and the test.  Also note that this Tuesday is the first night of STEM Club – we’ll be cleaning up the old home ec room to use for our projects.

Benchmarks Addressed:

MS-ESS22-4:  Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

MS-PS1-4:  Develop a model that predicts and describes changes in particle motion, temperature, and state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added or removed.

MS-ETS1-1:Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.

 

Monday

Students will begin the hour reviewing phase changes.  Students will then work on their final project, choosing a solution and defending it.

Essential Question:  How can we change the environment to influence the flow of water in our community?

Student Objective:

1.         Students will be able to use a water cycle model to help predict the effects of land use on water movement within a local watershed.

2.         Students will be able to identify and systematically rank well-defined criteria and constraints of an engineering problem.

3.         Students will develop an argument evaluating a proposed solution with respect to how well it meets the criteria and constraints of a problem, using a systematic process.

 

Tuesday

Students will complete their lesson project from Monday and present their findings.

 

Wednesday

Students will complete their presentations as needed.  Students will begin their unit test with the remaining time.

 

Thursday

Students will complete their unit 1 exam.

 

Friday – NO SCHOOL

Lesson Plans 10/15 – 10/19

Weekly Summary:  Welcome to the 1st week of Marking Period 2.  We continue working on our unit problem of solving the river flooding a local community.  This week emphasizes the water cycle and how water transitions from one phase to another in nature.  This week also marks our first Student-Led Conference on Thursday – notable especially because it is a 1/2 day for students.

Benchmarks Addressed:

MS-ESS22-4:  Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

MS-PS1-4:  Develop a model that predicts and describes changes in particle motion, temperature, and state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added or removed.

MS-ETS1-1:Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.

 

Monday

Students will begin the hour completing a lesson summary sheet for the PHET model lesson, identifying how it fits into our unit challenge.  Students will then complete Compass work based on areas identified by MAP as needing improvement.  Note advanced students will have high school level work available to them if they choose to try it.

Essential Question:  What area do I need to work on to improve my MAP?

Student Objective:  Students will complete Compass Odyssey lessons in their lowest scoring MAP area.

Tuesday

Students will begin the hour watching a video on a bottle in a garden.  Students will then diagram a model showing a contained water cycle in class.  Students will then complete a Freyer diagram for 4 important water cycle vocabulary words.

Essential Question:

1.  How does water change into a solid, liquid, or gas?
2.  How does this affect the water cycle?

Student Objective:  Students will develop a model of the water cycle within a closed system.

Homework:  Big Box Lot Sheet
Wednesday – LAB DAY

Students will begin the hour reviewing lab expectations.  Students will then complete the “Incredible Journey” water path lab.  Students will end the hour by diagramming a model showing the water cycle.

Essential Question

1.  Where does water in our community come from and where does it go?
2.  How can humans change the way water moves?

Student Objective:

  1. Students will develop a model to describe how water is continuously cycling through observable and unobservable phenomena.
  2. Students will construct an explanation for the effect humans can have on the movement of water in a local watershed or water cycle.
  3. Students will explain the relationship of a local water cycle to the global water cycle including the system boundaries, components, inputs/output and flow of energy and matter.

 

Thursday – 1/2 Day

Students will begin the hour by completing their water cycle model posters.  Students will then perform a gallery walk, making comments on each other’s works.  Students will then add to their models based on what they’ve seen in other groups’ works.  Students will end the hour adding to their parking lot/forest lot models.

Essential Question

1.  Where does water in our community come from and where does it go?
2.  How can humans change the way water moves?

Student Objective:

  1. Students will develop a model to describe how water is continuously cycling through observable and unobservable phenomena.
  2. Students will construct an explanation for the effect humans can have on the movement of water in a local watershed or water cycle.
  3. Students will explain the relationship of a local water cycle to the global water cycle including the system boundaries, components, inputs/output and flow of energy and matter.

 

Friday

Students will begin the hour by examining the Mackinac Straits and discussing problems with crossing.  Students will then design and build a bridge after being given a set of constraints and criteria.  Students will evaluate one another’s designs and identify possible improvements to their own project.

Essential Question:  

  • How can we make sure we have a good solution to a problem?

Student Objectives:

  1. Students will ask questions about a problem within a system.
  2. Students will use models and provided information to define the criteria, constraints, system boundaries, system components, inputs and outputs of a problem.
  3. Students will identify the relationship between components associated with the problem and/or the solution(s).
  4. Students will construct an argument based on evidence for why well-defined criteria and constraints are necessary for a well-defined problem and a successful solution.

 

 

 

Lesson Plans 10/8 – 10/12

Weekly Summary: Holy smokes, it’s the end of marking period 1 already!  This week marks a slightly shortened week as students have a half day Friday.  Unfortunately I was out a day last week so we’re slightly behind schedule but I’m hoping to make that up shortly by pushing a bit harder on labs.  This week will mark the 1st time students will use lab stations.  Please note that ALL missing work is due by the end of the week or no credit can be assessed due to grades locking.

Benchmarks Addressed:

MS-ESS22-4:  Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

MS-PS1-4:  Develop a model that predicts and describes changes in particle motion, temperature, and state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added or removed.

MS-ETS1-1:Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.

 

Monday – Compass Odyssey

Students will begin the hour completing a lesson summary on the phases of matter material learned last week.  Students will then work on a Compass Odyssey lesson targeted by their NWEA-MAP score.

Essential Question:  Why does water move differently in different states?;

Student Objective:  Students will summarize what they have learned about phases of matter.

 

Tuesday – Lab Day

Students will begin the hour with an anchor video.  Students will then head to lab and participate in a number of lab stations meant to show how water moves over and through various substances.

Student Objectives:

  1. Students will develop a model to describe that the movement of water between reservoirs may be driven by the force of gravity via precipitation, runoff (e.g. stream flow, water moving over land), infiltration, and groundwater flow.
  2. Students will analyze and interpret data to describe that changes in landforms (hills, valleys, etc) and surface/subsurface material (soil, concrete, clay, gravel, etc) will affect the amount of water that moves through a specific gravity-driven process within the water system.

Essential Question:

What causes water to go into a stream?

Homework:  No Homework Today unless student has missing work

 

Wednesday

Students will begin the hour by completing a lesson summary on what they learned in lab Tuesday.   Students will then add to their lot models to show gravity as a driving force.  Remainder of the hour will be used to prepare for SLCs.

Student Objective:  Students will summarize how gravity moves water through our community.

Essential Question: What causes water to go into a stream?

 

Thursday – Lab Day

Students will begin the hour with a “Fried Ice” demonstration.  Students will then create rain-maker models.  Students will chart out how the rain maker models work as a class.

Essential Question:  

  • How does water change state, from solid to liquid to gas?
  • How does this affect the water system?

Student Objectives:

  1. Students will use a model to gather data about the relationship between the transfer of thermal energy and the motion of a molecule.
  2. Students will develop a model to include how the transfer of thermal energy in the water system determines how water moves in the water system due to phase changes via the process of evaporation, condensation, freezing, and melting.
  3. Students will construct an explanation using their model as evidence to predict and describe the relationship between the addition or removal of thermal energy from water particles and the change in the motion of the particles of water.

Friday – 1/2 Day

Students will begin the hour by making observations about their rainmaker.   Students will then watch a short video on solar stills and other water purification techniques. Students will then complete a lesson summary on their rainmaker models.

Essential Question:  How does water changing state drive the water cycle?

Student Objective:  Students will summarize the lesson goals for the rainmaker models.

 

 

Lesson Plans 10/1 – 10/5

Weekly Summary:  So the MAP test took pretty much forever and pushed us back a couple of days.  This week the students will dig into Mi-STAR 6.1 and examine the way water flows through our communities.  They’ll be spending time learning about how water interacts with different substrates as well as spending some time in the lab.

Benchmarks Addressed:

MS-ESS22-4:  Develop a model to describe the cycling of water through Earth’s systems driven by energy from the sun and the force of gravity.

MS-PS1-4:  Develop a model that predicts and describes changes in particle motion, temperature, and state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added or removed.

MS-ETS1-1:Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.

Monday

Students will begin the hour with an anchor video.  Students will then observe where water can be found in a series of pictures.  Students will then be introduced to the unit challenge and complete a bubble/thinking map of what they will need to learn to complete the challenge.

Student Objectives:

  1. Students will communicate their prior knowledge and experience of where water is found in their community.
  2. Students will communicate their prior knowledge and experience of whether or not humans can impact the water system in their community.
  3. Students will use a (model) to communicate their prior knowledge and experience of the various ways people need and use water as a resource.

Essential Question:

How does human development affect how water moves through our community?

Tuesday

Students will begin the hour identifying different states of matter and come up with a “rules” list  to help identify them.  Students will then work with PhET models to identify the differences in particle movement as temperature and pressure change.

Student Objectives:

  1. Students will develop a model of water molecules in each state of matter to describe water as molecules in constant motion that are too small to see.
  2. Students will use the model to describe the relative spacing and motion of molecules while in solid, liquid, and gas phases.

Essential Question:

Why does water move differently in different states?

 

Wednesday 

Students will continue their PhET model lesson.  During the 2nd half of the hour students will complete a lesson summary sheet on the lesson.

Thursday – Lab Day

Students will begin the hour with an anchor video.  Students will then head to lab and participate in a number of lab stations meant to show how water moves over and through various substances.

Student Objectives:

  1. Students will develop a model to describe that the movement of water between reservoirs may be driven by the force of gravity via precipitation, runoff (e.g. stream flow, water moving over land), infiltration, and groundwater flow.
  2. Students will analyze and interpret data to describe that changes in landforms (hills, valleys, etc) and surface/subsurface material (soil, concrete, clay, gravel, etc) will affect the amount of water that moves through a specific gravity-driven process within the water system.

Essential Question:

What causes water to go into a stream?

Homework:  Water Changes State Embedded Assessment

 

Friday

Compass Odyssey – Students will complete a Compass Odyssey lesson selected based on their NWEA-MAP scores.  Students will receive small group attention during this time as well as review grades and goals.

 

Lesson Plans 9/24 – 9/28

Weekly Summary: Welcome to pre-test week!  Not really, but it kind of feels that way.  This week students will be taking their Fall NWEA science test.  The test is meant to place where they are ability-wise in order to help us give more meaningful instruction as well as to measure growth over the year.  Students will also begin their Mi-STAR 6.1 unit, which emphasizes water as it moves around the Earth.  

Benchmarks Addressed:

  • Gravity causes water to flow down as precipitation, down over the ground as runoff, and through the ground through infiltration.
  • The location of high points (or peaks), ridges, and slopes determines the direction water flows and where it ends up.
  • Land cover affects the rate of infiltration and runoff. Water does not infiltrate all surfaces.
  • Some processes move water more quickly than others. Water moves more quickly as runoff  than as groundwater.
  • When water infiltrates the ground, it can collect and move underground as groundwater.
  • Identify model components (and define boundaries, describe limitations, identify scales, etc.).
  • Identify and describe relationships and/or interactions between components.
  • Use a model to describe how matter moves through a system

 

Monday

Students will spend the hour taking their 6.1 pre-assessment.  Students who finish early may complete their TinkerCAD project.

 

Tuesday – NWEA Day

Students will spend the hour taking their NWEA Fall Science assessment.  Students who finish early may complete their TinkerCAD project.
Note:  No homework will be assigned today.

 

Wedndesday – NWEA Day

Students will complete unfinished NWEA tests and unit 6.1 Pre-tests.  Students who have these completed may complete their TinkerCAD project.

 

Thursday – MiSTAR 6.1 Lesson 1

Students will begin the hour with an anchor video.  Students will then observe where water can be found in a series of pictures.  Students will then be introduced to the unit challenge and complete a bubble/thinking map of what they will need to learn to complete the challenge.

Student Objectives:  

  1. Students will communicate their prior knowledge and experience of where water is found in their community.
  2. Students will communicate their prior knowledge and experience of whether or not humans can impact the water system in their community.
  3. Students will use a (model) to communicate their prior knowledge and experience of the various ways people need and use water as a resource.

Essential Question:  

How does human development affect how water moves through our community?

Friday – Lab Day – MiSTAR 6.1 Lesson 2

Students will begin the hour with an anchor video.  Students will then head to lab and participate in a number of lab stations meant to show how water moves over and through various substances.

Student Objectives:

  1. Students will develop a model to describe that the movement of water between reservoirs may be driven by the force of gravity via precipitation, runoff (e.g. stream flow, water moving over land), infiltration, and groundwater flow.
  2. Students will analyze and interpret data to describe that changes in landforms (hills, valleys, etc) and surface/subsurface material (soil, concrete, clay, gravel, etc) will affect the amount of water that moves through a specific gravity-driven process within the water system.

Essential Question:

What causes water to go into a stream?

 

Lesson Plans 9/17 – 9/21

Weekly Summary:  Welcome to the third week of school!  This page will be a resource for parents and students to see what we are studying.  Links that are useful for class can be found in the Student Links section and digital copies of assignments can be found under the homework link.

This week we continue to establish procedures and processes.  The lessons here are part of the Project Lead the Way engineering unit.  Students are learning about the Design Process, 3D Modeling and Design, and will be working on an introductory project.

 

Benchmarks Addressed:

MS-ETS1-1. Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.

ETS1.A: Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems

  • The more precisely a design task’s criteria and constraints can be defined, the more likely it is that the designed solution will be successful. Specification of constraints includes consideration of scientific principles and other relevant knowledge that are likely to limit possible solutions.
MS-ETS1-2. Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
MS-ETS1-3. Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differencesamong several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.
MS-ETS1-4. Develop a model to generate data for iterative testing and modification of a proposed object, tool, or process such that an optimal design can be achieved.

 

Monday

Students will begin the hour reviewing computer expectations and accessing TinkerCAD.  Students will then complete the TinkerCAD tutorial lessons.  Students will then be introduced to puzzle blocks and brainstorm ideas on how to create a 3D “key” to the puzzle.

Essential Question:  How can a 3D CAD program be used to represent ideas and products in a useful fashion?

Assessment:  Tutorial Summary Sheet

Tuesday

Students will begin the hour by reviewing what makes a good representation for the puzzle blocks.  Students will then create a puzzle block key using the TinkerCAD program.  Students will share their work and identify what worked well and what could be improved upon in a respectful manner.

Essential Question:  How can a 3D CAD program be used to represent ideas and products in a useful fashion?

Differentiation:  Students who excel at the modeling via computer will be directed to activities designed to test and improve spatial awareness.

Homework:  Sketching Practice

 

Wednesday

Students will begin the hour by looking at a sketches and trying to match objects from different viewpoints.  Students will then be introduced to orthographic drawings.  Students will use snap blocks in order to compare physical objects with their drawings.

Essential Questions:  What are different methods of communicating ideas and designs?

 

Thursday

Students will begin the hour creating a note outline covering the design process.  Students will then use the design process and snap blocks to create puzzle cubes of their own design.

Essential Question:  How can we use the design process to solve a problem?

Homework:  Students will review a sample project and identify strengths and weaknesses of the design.

 

Friday

Students will complete their snap block puzzle cube lesson from Thursday.

Essential Question:  How can we use the design process to solve a problem?

Assessment:  Puzzle Block Submission

Milwood STEM Magnet – 6th Grade Science