Lesson Plans 5/20 – 5/25

Weekly Summary:  As we continue to work through our ecosystem unit, students will begin to look at the details of a Michigan ecosystem.  Students will identify abiotic and biotic components and relationships within their selected ecosystem.  They will create a food web about the ecosystem and make predictions regarding what the impact of an invasive species will be.

Benchmarks Addressed:

  • MS-LS2-1 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
  • MS-LS2-2 Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.
  • MS-LS2-4 Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations. 
  • MS-ETS1-2 Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

 

Monday

Students will select an ecosystem they wish to work with.  They will create a slide document identifying organisms within the ecosystem and the resources they require, as well as abiotic factors present.

Essential Question:  What are the components of a Michigan Ecosystem?

Student Objective:  Students will identify components of a Michigan ecosystem.

 

Tuesday – Wednesday

Students will begin the hour by watching a short video clip on food webs.  Students will then define producers and consumers, identifying the source of energy for each.  Students will then complete and add a food web to their slides presentation, showing how the organisms within their ecosystem interact.

Essential Question:  How does food move through an ecosystem?

Student Objective:  Students will model the flow of energy through an ecosystem.

 

Thursday – Friday

Students will identify an invasive species relevant to their ecosystem and predict the impact it will have.  Students will then develop a decision matrix to identify a solution to their invasive species while considering constraints and criteria.

Essential Question:  How can we use constraints and criteria to come up with the best solution for our ecosystem problem?

Student Objective:  Students will use a decision matrix to help them determine the best solution to an invasive species.

 

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Lesson Plans 5/13 – 5/17

Weekly Summary:  We find ourselves working through a great deal of assessment.  Last week students spent their time with their math M-STEP, 6.4 Force Test, and 6.6 Ecosystem Pretest.  Students have also explored biotic and abiotic components and have started looking at relationships between organisms.  This week students will continue their M-STEP testing with ELA.  They will also continue to examine different relationships and their impacts on population.

Benchmarks Addressed:

  • MS-LS2-1 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.
  • MS-LS2-2 Construct an explanation that predicts patterns of interactions among organisms across multiple ecosystems.
  • MS-LS2-4 Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations. 
  • MS-ETS1-2 Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

Big Ideas:

  • Organisms interact with one another (both within and between species) and the environment in consistent patterns across different ecosystems.
  • Seemingly small changes to the environment and/or the species found in an ecosystem can cause drastic changes.

 

Monday-Wednesday

Essential Question:

  • How can a relationship between two species benefit both species?
  • How can this beneficial relationship affect each population?

Learning Performance:

  1. Students will identify patterns of mutualistic relationships that exist between organisms in multiple ecosystems.
  2. Students will explain how species benefit from mutualistic interactions.

 

Students will watch a number of videos showing different mutualistic relationships.  They will identify roles in the relationships and how each organism benefits.  They will discuss the consequences of becoming interdependent.  Students will then analyze data regarding the relationship between Yucca Moths and Yucca plants.

Assessment:  Illuminate mini-quiz

 

Thursday-Friday

Essential Question:

  • What is the effect on populations of organisms when the abiotic components of an ecosystem change?

Learning Performance:

  1. Students will analyze and interpret data, generated from a model, to provide evidence that abiotic factors can affect populations.
  2. Students will construct an explanation using qualitative relationships for how changes in the abiotic environment may affect multiple populations.

Students will begin the lesson by watching a fox hunt for mice in the snow.  Students will then perform a simulation modelling deer population and winter in Michigan.  Students will then analyze the data and share conclusions regarding how abiotic factors can affect population.

Assessment:  Collins Writing – What factors can influence an organisms population?

Lesson Plans 4/22 – 4/26

Weekly Summary:  This marks the last week of marking period 5.  We’ve been making up ground from our missing snow days and working our way through the force and motion unit quickly.  This week we are going to attempt to wrap up this short unit in preparation for moving onto our next units – ecosystems, photosynthesis, and some very basic genetics.  Please note we have a 1/2 day Friday.  Work will be accepted until final bell Friday.  Please note that other classes have other deadlines.  Also, work has been updated in the “Homework” section.  Students who are missing a Compass Odyssey lesson may access Compass at home or  substitute a Bill Nye or other video posted in the Student Links page.

Benchmarks Addressed:

    • MS-ETS1-1 Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution.
    • MS-PS2-1 Apply Newton’s Third Law to design a solution to a problem involving the motion of two colliding objects.
    • MS-PS2-2 Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.

 

Monday – Wednesday:

Essential Questions:
                  1.  What makes a fair investigation?
2.  What happens when two objects collide?

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students evaluate ideas of what makes a “fair test.”
  2. Students reach consensus on fair testing protocol and apply these ideas to an investigation.
  3. Students design a model to show testing, results, and conclusions from an experiment.
  4. Students conclude that mass affects the motion of objects.
  5. Students conclude that the magnitude of force affects the motion of objects.

Students will begin the hour observing force interactions using rolling chairs/carts.   Students will then design a lab investigating the impact of mass and force using “penny launchers”.  Students will collect and analyze data, reporting their conclusions.

Embedded Assessment:  Spongebob Physics

Embedded Assessment:  Students will complete an activity to identify whether or not a lab is “fair”, identifying dependent, independent, and controlled variables.

Thursday-Friday

Students will complete the 6.4 assessment.  Extra time allotted due to duration of test being significantly longer than last.

 

 

 

Lesson Plans 3/11 – 3/15

Weekly Summary:  Holy smokes, it’s March!  Literacy night is done and our next big project is the WMU field trip next week.  Look for permission slips that need to be signed and returned with updated contact information!  Class-wise we’re still plugging away at our chemistry unit.  We likely won’t be done with it by the end of the marking period but I’m confident we’ll be wrapped up by Spring Break (which is closer than you think!).  Please note I flipped several lessons scheduled for the previous week to this one due to Literacy Night lab restrictions.

Benchmarks Addressed:

  • MS-LS1-7  Develop a model to describe how food is rearranged through chemical reactions forming new molecules that support growth and/or release energy as this matter moves through an organism.
  • MS-PS1-2 Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.
  • MS-PS1-5 Develop and use a model to describe how the total number of atoms does not change in a chemical reaction and thus mass is conserved.
  • MS-PS1-6  Undertake a design project to construct, test, and modify a device that uses either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical processes.*

 

Monday

Essential Question:  What is the difference between physical changes and chemical changes as well as physical properties and chemical properties?

Students will complete a formative assessment gauging what they’ve learned about physical vs chemical changes so far.  Students will then complete power point presentation about physical vs chemical change.  Students who have completed this activity will work on chemistry oriented Compass Odyssey lessons.

 

Tuesday – Wednesday

Essential Question – “How do we change substances and what they’re made of?”

Student Objectives

  1. Students will be able to analyze a process, or evidence gathered from a process, to identify whether a chemical reaction has occurred.
  2. Students will be able to use a model explain how molecules are broken down and rearranged to form new molecules in a chemical reaction.
  3. Students will be able to use a model to demonstrate or apply Conservation of Matter in chemical reactions.

Students will begin the hour defining key terms.  Students will then go to lab where they will observe a number of situations and identify whether a new substance has been made or the old substance changed appearance.   Students will record and discuss what they discover about differences between physical and chemical change.

 

Thursday – Friday

Students will work with their Carl and Mary models, detailing components of the digestive tract and how substances interact.

Lesson Plans 2/25 – 3/1

Weekly Summary:  I think things may possibly be getting back to normal schedule-wise.  All-school Read obligations are all wrapped up and while March weather can be dicey, I’m optimistic we’ll be in school until Spring Break (fewer weeks away than you think I bet!).  This week students will continue their investigation into digestion and chemical changes.

Benchmarks Addressed:

  • MS-LS1-7  Develop a model to describe how food is rearranged through chemical reactions forming new molecules that support growth and/or release energy as this matter moves through an organism.
  • MS-PS1-2 Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.
  • MS-PS1-5 Develop and use a model to describe how the total number of atoms does not change in a chemical reaction and thus mass is conserved.
  • MS-PS1-6  Undertake a design project to construct, test, and modify a device that uses either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical processes.*

 

Monday – Tuesday

Essential Question– “How do substances get their observable properties?”

Student Objectives

  1. Students will be able to analyze data (number of atoms, observable properties) to identify the molecule
  2. Students will be able to interpret data to determine similarities and differences in findings
  3. Students will be able to use a model to predict observable properties of a substance

Students will begin the hour reviewing macronutrient properties discovered in the previous two weeks.  Students will then be provided marshmallows and toothpicks to create their own molecules.  Students will finish the hour by observing molecule models and matching them with observable property traits.

 

Students will begin the next hour by defining key terms discussed Monday.  Students will then receive a Carl and Mary enzyme/water guide and track interaction of different molecules based on their structure.  Students will then compare properties of macronutrients.

Homework:  Atoms and Molecules Reading

 

Wednesday – Friday – Lab Days

Essential Question – “How do we change substances and what they’re made of?”

Student Objectives

  1. Students will be able to analyze a process, or evidence gathered from a process, to identify whether a chemical reaction has occurred.
  2. Students will be able to use a model explain how molecules are broken down and rearranged to form new molecules in a chemical reaction.
  3. Students will be able to use a model to demonstrate or apply Conservation of Matter in chemical reactions.

Students will begin the hour defining key terms.  Students will then go to lab where they will observe a number of situations and identify whether a new substance has been made or the old substance changed appearance.   Students will record and discuss what they discover about differences between physical and chemical change.

Students will then perform an investigation on conservation of mass during a chemical reaction.  Students will discuss their findings and draw a conclusion about the difference between physical and chemical changes.  Students will then complete a lesson summary sheet identifying what they’ve learned.

 

 

Lesson Plans 2/4 – 2/8

Weekly Summary:  Can’t say I’ve ever had a week like last week.  6 snow days in a row not withstanding, I also found myself down with pneumonia and will be approaching this week cautiously.  Current plan is for students to begin their Unit 3 challenge and lessons about the chemical nature of digestion.

Benchmarks Addressed:

  • MS-LS1-7  Develop a model to describe how food is rearranged through chemical reactions forming new molecules that support growth and/or release energy as this matter moves through an organism.
  • MS-PS1-2 Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.
  • MS-PS1-5 Develop and use a model to describe how the total number of atoms does not change in a chemical reaction and thus mass is conserved.
  • MS-PS1-6  Undertake a design project to construct, test, and modify a device that uses either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical processes.*

 

Monday:

Students will work with Compass Odyssey today.  Lesson is based on NWEA score from the Fall.  Students will write 10 lines summarizing what they learned during this lesson.

Student Objective:  Students will complete a Compass Odyssey lesson in the area MAP has identified as weakest.

 

Tuesday + Wednesday + Thursday:

Unit Challenge:  How do we choose food to address diet-related problems?

Student Learning Performances:

  1. Students will communicate their prior knowledge and experience of how and why our bodies process food matter.
  2. Students will communicate their prior knowledge and experience of how our bodies use food to grow and gain energy.
  3. Students will use a model to communicate their understanding of the main components and interactions of our body’s digestive system.

Students will begin the hour by playing “Name that poop!”, in which they will identify which animal produced which feces.  Not even joking.  Students will then compare pictures of different bear poop…deposited…during different seasons of the year.

Students will then complete a digestion activity in which they model what happens to food in the stomach.  Using the model students will develop an initial model regarding matter, energy, inputs, and outputs to the human body.  Students will share their models via a gallery walk.

After the gallery walk students will be presented with the unit challenge and come up with initial questions and avenues to investigate.

Students will then be introduced to the “Meal Design Process”, a surrogate for the Engineering Design Process tailored to this challenge.

Student Progress Assessment:  Students will develop a thinking bubble map about questions and knowledge gained so far for our unit challenge.

Friday – Lab Day

Lesson Questions:   How can we tell food apart?  What is food made up out of?

Student Objectives:

  1. Students will be able to identify patterns that relate a food’s macronutrient content to it’s observable properties.
  2. Students will be able to organize and use food macronutrient data to identify similar and different foods.

Students will begin the hour by comparing nutrition labels on breakfast cereals.  Students will then head to lab where they will make observations on 6 different foods that exemplify major nutritional molecules/components.

 

 

 

Lesson Plans 1/28 – 2/1

Weekly Summary:  Students will receive updated instructions on how to battle the White Walkers as they make their way across the frozen north to the southern kingdoms.  Seriously – have you looked at this week’s forecasted weather?  It’s sorta nuts.

In the event Dr. Rice is replaced by Mr. Freeze and we have school…pretty much at all…students will take their NWEA test.  Students will then being their Unit 3 lesson about poop.  Not really kidding.  We’re learning how to help a guy poop and a gal not poop.  Nominally it’s a lesson about chemistry and the properties of different molecules in food but I guarantee the kids are going to tell you they’re learning about pooping so might as well get out in front of it.

Benchmarks Addressed:

  • MS-LS1-7  Develop a model to describe how food is rearranged through chemical reactions forming new molecules that support growth and/or release energy as this matter moves through an organism.
  • MS-PS1-2 Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.
  • MS-PS1-5 Develop and use a model to describe how the total number of atoms does not change in a chemical reaction and thus mass is conserved.
  • MS-PS1-6  Undertake a design project to construct, test, and modify a device that uses either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical processes.*

 

Monday

Students will work on their NWEA test after riding tontons across 8″ of snow in the freezing, windy cold.

 

Tuesday

Students that survived yesterday’s trek will brave sub-zero temperatures and whatever didn’t get plowed today in a valiant effort to finish their NWEA test.  Students that complete the NWEA early may finish the Unit 3 pre-test or work on Compass Odyssey.

 

Wednesday

The predicted weather is -35 today.  Turns out -40F = -40C.  Not sure I ever thought I’d live to see that in real life, but we’re within spitting distance!

 

Thursday – 1/2 Day

Still skeptical about school today but just in case, students will be working on any stragglers for the NWEA test (I’m expecting absenteeism to be rather high if we have school earlier this week).  Students that are done with the NWEA may work on Compass Odyssey.

 

Friday

I can see actually having school today based on the current forecast.

Unit Challenge:  How do we choose food to address diet-related problems?

Student Learning Performances:

  1. Students will communicate their prior knowledge and experience of how and why our bodies process food matter.
  2. Students will communicate their prior knowledge and experience of how our bodies use food to grow and gain energy.
  3. Students will use a model to communicate their understanding of the main components and interactions of our body’s digestive system.

Students will begin the hour by playing “Name that poop!”, in which they will identify which animal produced which feces.  Not even joking.  Students will then compare pictures of different bear poop…deposited…during different seasons of the year.

Students will then complete a digestion activity in which they model what happens to food in the stomach.

On completion and discussion of the digestion activity students will review the unit challenge.

 

Milwood STEM Magnet – 6th Grade Science